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lovethyfatness:

[Series of texts by @fatnutritionist, which read: “People are mad at me because they ‘work so hard’ to be fit or lose weight. They have told me this explicitly. It implies that they think my rejecting the values they subscribe to can somehow take away the fitness they’ve worked for. That is totally delusional. If you’ve worked hard for fitness, no amount of fat people rejecting stigma can take that away. So this is obviously not actually about fitness, at all. It’s about the other thing they ‘worked hard’ for: social status. They DO think, and they know, that the social status they have worked hard to earn, through ‘fitness,’ can be devalued. It can be devalued if the hierarchy that rewards them is crushed. Crushed by people rejecting stigma. We can’t take away your fitness or whatever weight you’ve lost. But we can devalue those things by destroying fat stigma. So they are afraid of us, and for good reason. If fat people aren’t stigmatized, then there is no more thin privilege. Remember always, fat people: People are afraid of you because you have an awesome power - to destroy the hierarchy. If they were not afraid of losing their place in the hierarchy, they would not come after you so viciously.” All tweets were accompanied by the hashtag, #notyourgoodfatty]

Read the full thread of Michelle’s tweets on Storify.

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While the context and narrative itself sets up obstacles, the film often uses visuals to help express Clarice’s status in the order of things. A recurring visual motif is Clarice surrounded by taller men, dwarfed and brought down by their stature. Yes, Jodie Foster is a short woman, just a few inches over five feet, but the film often exaggerates that discrepancy to express her challenge in overcoming a patriarchal society that literally looks down on her. […]

The film camera also never objectifies Clarice. Throughout the film she is presented as an object of the male gaze by the characters in the narrative, but the camera does not assume this perspective of the male look until the end of the film. It’s at this point then that Clarice punishes and banishes the male gaze for objectifying her. [x]

(Source: kissthefuture, via alphabetizingsins)

Filed under Silence of the Lambs Clarice Starling

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I adore the way fan fiction writers engage with and critique source texts, but manipulating them and breaking their rules. Some of it is straight-up homage, but a lot of [fan fiction] is really aggressive towards the source text. One tends to think of it as written by total fanboys and fangirls as a kind of worshipful act, but a lot of times you’ll read these stories and it’ll be like ‘What if Star Trek had an openly gay character on the bridge?’ And of course the point is that they don’t, and they wouldn’t, because they don’t have the balls, or they are beholden to their advertisers, or whatever. There’s a powerful critique, almost punk-like anger, being expressed there—which I find fascinating and interesting and cool.
Lev Grossman (via mycrofts)

(via stillislife)